Buttermilk Tin Loaf

I bake tin loafs quite often, because my kids love soft white bread for breakfast. (post about White Tin Loaf updated with recipe, and also here Square Tin Loaf-plain milk white)

When Sabine from Mamangerie wrote about a lovely bread she made using buttermilk, I was very excited.
I use buttermilk for Irish soda bread and wheaten, but those breads raise with baking soda+baking powder. I had never thought about using buttermilk for yeast bread. So I decided to try using buttermilk in my tin loaf to see how it work out.

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The result was fantastic. The bread raised well, and it was moist and tasty. It has slightly tangy flavour but it is the charm of buttermilk.

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Since I stop buying bread for Lent, I didn’t really stop the Lent after Easter. I bought one pack of loaf on Easter Sunday and a couple of snack bread for kids after that. I kept baking most of the breads we eat at home, and tin loaf is vital part of our everyday breakfast. It is great to have these variations in my tin loaf recipe, so that this basic bread never get boring.

Another variation I liked was raisin bread.
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I put some large raisins to the buttermilk bread dough, and baked this loaf in a silicon loaf tin which is slightly bigger than my usual bread tin.

White Tin Loaf with Buttermilk

  • Servings: 1.5 lb bread tin OR slightly larger tin if you are adding raisin
  • Difficulty: easy/intermediate
  • Print

strong flour…….350g (for open top, mountain shape loaf.  If you like to put raisin in, reduce to 300g and adjust quantity of ingredients below accordingly OR use slightly bigger tin as I did for the picture above)

yeast………………3g
sugar……………..15g
salt………………….3g
buttermilk (just slightly warm or room temperature) …….240-250cc
butter…………….20g

raisin if using…….70g or so, as much as you like

1. Knead dough, without butter for 5 min using a mixer. Or knead by hand for bit longer.
2. Add butter, and knead further 5 min. This bread really needs good kneading. Dough will be silky smooth. (If you want to add raisin, add now, and knead more to mix raisin in)
3. Place dough in lightly oiled bowl and leave in warm place for 90min to 2 hours, until the dough is double in size. It will get nice and big.
4. Gently take the dough out in lightly floured surface. Divide the dough into 2 or 3. Gently form the dough into a ball, take bench time for 20 min, covered with plastic or tea towel.
5. Shape the dough: take each ball, flatten them gently, take top 1/3 and fold down. lift bottom 1/3 and fold up. pinch the joint gently to stick. Dough is now fat sausage shape. Flat them a little, then roll. Do same for the rest, and place them in oiled tin.
6. Leave to rise for second time, covered, in warm place for 45 min to 1 hour or so, till it’s head come out the tin. (or up to 80% of the tin, if you are going to use a lid)
7. Bake in the preheated oven 220C for about 30min.
(when I am using a lid, I bake it for 22min, turn off oven and leave it in for 15 min.)
8. As soon as it comes out of oven, take it out of the tin, leave it to cool in wired lack. Once cooled, keep in plastic bag or air tight container to keep soft.

I like those bread with butter and jam for breakfast. It is such a treat to have freshly baked warm bread, but I tend to bake them in the evening, as I don’t have time to bake before weekday breakfast. Those bread are nice and soft at breakfast next morning, and it is lovely toasted a day after that.

Happy Fiesta Friday!!
Have a nice weekend.

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Soda Farls

We had a nice St.Patrick’s day, as my husband and son were off work/school, we enjoyed small holiday this weekend.

We  went to see the parade in Derry (Londonderry) this year.
The parade was nice, except a huge dragon made my 3 years old son cry. He cried last year’s parade in Downpatrick as well. Poor wee man!

To celebrate St.Patrick’s day, I made those.

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Soda Farls.
A great Northern Ireland’s tradition in a edible form.

‘Soda’ is a traditional bread of Ireland.
In a good Belfast home bakery, you can see so many Irish/Northern Irish traditional breads, especially ‘soda’ type.
They aren’t raised with yeast like usual bread, but with bicarbonate soda (baking soda), thus the name ‘soda’ bread/farls.

Soda bread (usually cob shape, cross cut in the middle),
Wheaten bread (soda bread’s whole meal version, either cob or tin loaf shape, = ‘brown soda’),
Soda farls (baked flat on the griddle, 1/4 round shape),
Raisin or fruits soda (raisins in soda farls),
Treacle soda (black treacle= molasses syrup mixed in the soda farls, slightly brown and sweet)
Wheaten farls (wholemeal soda farls)

These are the type of soda type breads sold at my local bakery as much as I can recall now, and I haven’t even mentioned ‘potato bread’ yet. (I leave that for another day!)

Yes, we love our ‘soda’!

Soda farl is very important part of our ‘fry’.
Ulster fry, the fried breakfast, wont be ‘fry’ without one, along with potato bread.
I don’t do so much ‘fry’ (you can do veg version with veg sausage and stuffs), but we do ‘egg soda’ (fried soda farls with fried egg) time to time, and soda farl is also nice just toasted with butter and jam or cheese.

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Farls are made on a griddle.
The best farls I’ve ever tasted was  the one made on the top of wood fire griddle at Ulster Folk Museum. It must be how soda farls are made in good old days, and it was so tasty with the smell of coal.
I used the same griddle I used with Welsh cakes.

I made this for breakfast, it’s quick and easy because there is no need to prove like normal bread. You can eat it straight from oven, just cut in half, with butter. Or you can toast it, or shallow fry it. Yum!

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Recipe

(make 8 farls)

450g plain flour
1 tbs sugar
1/2 tsp salt
7g baking soda
10g baking powder
20g butter
300g buttermilk ( if you cannot get butter milk, you can use 150g milk+150g yogurt)

1. Sieve all the dry ingredients into a bowl.
2. Rub butter into flour mix completely.
3. Make a well in the middle, add the buttermilk, mix them together. (like you are making scones)
4. Turn out the dough onto a well floured surface and gently knead into a round shape. (not over work, just make into a nice round ball.)
5. Divide into two and knead both to form round balls again.
6. Roll these out about 1.5cm thick, about 25cm in diameter and cut into quarters. (farl means quarter )
7. Preheat the griddle. (no oil) or heavy based frying pan.
8. Place the farls onto the preheated griddle and once you have a good colour on one side (2-3 mins), flip over and cook for 5-10 minutes.
9.If the middle is not squidgy, it is cooked. If it is still squidgy in the middle, just keep turning till it is cooked.
10. Cool on racks, and enjoy!

*I refereed to the recipe from Discover Northern Ireland, and altered it slightly according to the recipe which I use for soda bread which I got sometime ago.

(March 2014)

White Tin Loaf

P1060604 (640x481)Simple white tin loaf.

A freshly baked simple white loaf is a treat.
This one is open top, mountain shape loaf, which is (apparently) good for toasting. However, we love these loaf so much that we just eat them with butter and jam.

I’ve make this loaf time to time, but something is different now.

The mountain is higher than ever.

I found a great flour for this loaf at a supermarket. It’s super strong Canadian flour with 14.8% protein! (Sainsbury’s Taste Difference Very Strong Canadian Bread Flour)

You can buy strong flour made with British wheat,  which I would normally buy, with protein content of 12.6% (Tesco’s Strong Flour)or so.
Some brand’s strong flour is bit more higher in protein content, above 13% protein content, but I haven’t seen over 14% before.

My heart jumped when I saw this flour. Such an excitement for home baker!

I used my usual recipe I use for open top loaf, and the result was so different and wonderful. You could feel it even when you are kneading it. Much strong, big volume loaf=higher mountains. Bouncy and tasty, as white loaf should be. (bit closer to Japanese baker’s ‘hotel bread’)
I was so surprised that protein (gluten) level actually affects volume of the loaf so much. If I was making closed top square loaf, I’d need to adjust recipe accordingly.

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This flour is not for all the bread I make. It will be best kept for loafs which I want a bit of bounce and chewiness, and some bread which mix with other ingredients that affects bread raising.

Oh, what a wonderful thing I found.
And I am happy that a small thing like this can make my day.

White Tin Loaf

  • Servings: 1.5 lb bread tin
  • Difficulty: intermediate
  • Print

strong flour…….350g (for mountain shape loaf, if you like to bake with lid on, reduce to 330g and adjust quantity of ingredients below accordingly.)
yeast………………3g
sugar……………..15g
salt………………….3g
milk (just slightly warm or room temperature) …….240-250cc
butter…………….20g

1. Knead dough, without butter for 5 min using a mixer. Or knead by hand for bit longer.
2. Add butter, and knead further 5 min. This bread really needs good kneading. Dough will be silky smooth.
3. Place dough in lightly oiled bowl and leave in warm place for 90min to 2 hours, until the dough is double in size. It will get nice and big.
4. Gently take the dough out in lightly floured surface. Divide the dough into 2 or 3. (The picture above on this post is 3 mountains, but I often do just 2) Gently form the dough into a ball, take bench time for 20 min, covered with plastic or tea towel.
5. Shape the dough: take each ball, flatten them gently, take top 1/3 and fold down. lift bottom 1/3 and fold up. pinch the joint gently to stick. Dough is now fat sausage shape. Flat them a little, then roll. Do same for the rest, and place them in oiled tin.
6. Leave to rise for second time, covered, in warm place for 45 min to 1 hour or so, till it’s head come out the tin. (or up to 80% of the tin, if you are going to use a lid)
7. Bake in the preheated oven 220C for about 30min.
(when I am using a lid, I bake it for 22min, turn off oven and leave it in for 15 min.)
8. As soon as it comes out of oven, take it out of the tin, leave it to cool in wired lack. Once cooled enough, slice and enjoy!

Tin Loaf – plain white milk

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I make bread nearly every other day or so, but I still need to buy shop breads for sandwiches and toasts for kids (they are not so fussed about my hard crust bread).
Then, sometimes, I realise that I would not have enough bread for tomorrow’s breakfast or for lunch box.
I live just around the corner from local shops, so I could either go to the shop which is open till late, or send my husband to it,

OR make one myself.

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My boys love this bread, because it is soft and slightly sweet. It’s lovely to eat as it is with butter and jam when it’s freshly baked, and good for toasting a day after.

I bought the loaf tin in Japan, and it is what I know as 1.5 (one and half) loaf tin. It’s about 2/3 of shop bought toast bread. Good size for family’s one meal.

I use milk instead of water, as original recipe required milk powder and I didn’t have it. It also has some sugar and butter added for richness. (good for the taste, not so good for the health….)

(Aug 2013)

Sausage Roll Bread

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This is not made with puff pastry as usual sausage roll in UK, this is a bread roll. In Japanese bakery, there are many different type of savory bun/roll type bread, like this one.

I am a semi-vegetarian, a pescetarian to be precise, and I don’t eat meat (but eat fish).  So I used vegetarian frankfurters for this bread. Soft white bread with a bit of brown mixed in, a touch of mustard inside, and Japanese mayo on top. Great for snack or lunch, and my boys loved it.

(June 2013)